How I Did It: the Pomegranate

Creating the pomegranate image from last month was a little complex, but very fun!

The finished image

Here is the original photograph. I was walking to an open house in my neighborhood (I wanted to see how they had upgraded the kitchen), when I ran across a small, skinny pomegranate tree bearing a single, bright red fruit. So I took a couple of photos with my iPhone. I liked this one best:

The original photograph

It was a nice enough photo, but I really wanted the red pomegranate to stand out. First I cropped the image and did some basic color adjustments, then I took it into Perfect Effects, part of the Perfect Photo Suite by OnOne Software. I often use this for my photos to create a lot of great, custom looks. This time I started off easy. First I lightened the shadows, then added an effect called Turbo Boost, which punches up the color, contrast and clarity of the image. Why did I lighten the shadows first? Because applying Turbo Boost without it would have caused me to lose some of the shadow detail that I wanted to keep… at least for now.

The photo with a few adjustments and a couple of effects

Then I masked out the pomegranate because I wanted to preserve the bright red I’d created while going in another direction completely with the rest of the image. I used an effect called Magic Forest because it really punches up the greens.

With the pomegranate removed

Then I added an effect inspired by photographer Michael Orton, to give the image a magical sort of feel, almost like a painting.

The Orton Clean effect

Of course, all that lush color was going to fight for attention with the red pomegranate, so I dialed it down by using a black and white filter and adjusting it to mute the colors. I used a black and white red filter so that it sucked out more of the photograph’s red values than any of the other colors. That way, it would make the red fruit stand out even more. Once I put the pomegranate back into the photo, I added in a touch of the deep forest effect to brighten the green leaves and to give the photo a nice glow. Then I added a border and that was the final image.

Using the green Black and White filter
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast)
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)
If you enjoyed this post, please consider leaving a comment or subscribing to the RSS feed!

2 thoughts on “How I Did It: the Pomegranate

  1. I like that the final image looks very natural. I always tend to go a bit to far with the color saturation on my photos as I work on a laptop and at every angle the photo looks different. Your blog is very informative and enjoyable. Thanks!

    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)
    VA:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.